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Submission for Ask Magazine - sources?

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I have a story I want to pitch to Ask Magazine, but I'm new to children's magazines (I do a lot of local news articles) and I'm not sure how many or what kinds of references and sources to include. For example, I found some relevant research summed up on the Science Daily website - is that good enough or should I find the original article?

Any help is appreciated.
Clara
#1 - November 25, 2014, 05:37 PM

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I like having at least 3 indep and reliable sources.
Good luck,
Vijaya
#2 - November 25, 2014, 06:22 PM
BOUND (Bodach Books, 2018)
TEN EASTER EGGS (Scholastic, 2015)
www.vijayabodach.blogspot.com
Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces

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If you can get the original articles that would be better.  If something is "summed up" there may be relevant pieces that are missing from the summary. 
#3 - November 25, 2014, 06:23 PM
Rebecca Langston-George
The Women's Rights Movement: Then and Now
Capstone: January, 2018

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Both these answers make a lot of sense to me - thanks! But it brings up one other question: How do other people access original scientific articles without paying a ton of money?

I'm not currently associated with a university, although I'm going to see if a community library card at the local university would allow me to access their databases. They probably have a lot of the physical journals I might need to read, but not necessarily all.
#4 - November 26, 2014, 05:25 AM

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Hi Clara,

ASK is such a lovely magazine. I sure hope you get the go ahead.

I use a number of sources to find journal articles. If you can find a title, believe it or not, you can often do a GOOGLE search and turn up an electronic copy hanging around somewhere. I also have used GoogleScholar, ResearchGate, Academia.edu. JSTOR will let you add three free articles to your "bookshelf" every two weeks. And your public library might have databases available.

When I'm in a real pinch, I've asked researchers for copies of their work, especially if I am featuring them in the article.

Good luck!

Kirsten
#5 - November 26, 2014, 06:35 AM
Kirsten W. Larson
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WOOD, WIRE, WINGS, illus. Tracy Subisak (Calkins Creek, 2020)
THE FIRE OF STARS, illus. Katherine Roy (Chronicle, 2021)

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