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Market for Long Story?

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I recently wrote a children's story of about 4,000 words for a contest, only to learn that the company is gone defunct. Those who critiqued my story really liked it and so I want to find a home for it. I know lots of children's magazines that accept shorter writings. Does anyone have suggestions of magazines or contests who are open to longer fiction?
#1 - January 21, 2015, 05:49 PM

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Allison, what's the age group? If it's YA, there are a small number of possible outlets. Cicada accepts work to 5,000 words. If it's a genre story, there are a few journals that take longer work. Unfortunately, some of those have gone out of business, too. One newish one is Baird Speculative Fiction, an e-zine that takes short stories up to 7,500 words. They do science fiction, steampunk and the like, and my understanding is that they do pay. I don't know anything else about them, though, so all the "research them first" caveats apply. There's also Sucker Literary, an e-zine which will take YA in any genre up to 10K words. I don't think they pay. Third Flatiron will take 3,000 words in sci-fi/fantasy.

If it's any younger than YA, the only outlet I know of is Cricket, whose top word count is 5-6K. If there's any chance the story can be condensed, more places might open up to you.

I'm sorry the contest company went OOB, and hope something works out for you!  :goodluck
#2 - January 22, 2015, 07:41 AM
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Thanks for all your suggestions! I tend to avoid writing stories, because my style doesn't suit the low-count of most markets. However, my writing club students and a contest market inspired me.

Anyway, the main characters are in fifth grade. It's a scary story on the light side with more humor than horror. I'd been thinking of Cricket too!

My husband suggested cutting to meet market needs. I could see getting my story down to 3000 words. Unfortunately, most markets I know about ask for stories of around 1000 words.

Do you know of any markets for middle grade that accept stories between 2000-3000? If not, I'll try Cricket. I've been wanting awhile to submit to them and so maybe this is the right story.
#3 - January 22, 2015, 08:18 AM

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I was thinking along the same lines as Marcia ... Cricket would be a good choice. They also serialize.
You could also cannibalize the story and see whether you can't have one plot thread for Highlights, another with a more religious angle for Pockets, a shorter one for Jack and Jill. MG magazine markets are alive and well.

Another option is to make it for older genre readers. Word counts are mighty generous (some are novellas) for SFF and the magazine is prestigious too. Do you have a magazine market guide available?

Vijaya
#4 - January 22, 2015, 10:03 AM
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I agree with Marcia and Vijaya that Cricket is probably your best bet.

If you don't find a good paying market and can get your word count down to 2500 and just want to see it published, Beyond Centauri might be a place to try. Unfortunately, they only pay $6.

Marcia, do you have a link for Baird Speculative Fiction? I couldn't find it when I Googled.
#5 - January 22, 2015, 04:00 PM

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Here's a link for Baird, to their guidelines page.

https://bairdpresents.wordpress.com/submissions/
#6 - January 22, 2015, 04:03 PM
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Thank you, Marcia. I think the reason I wasn't being able to find them is I was looking for a magazine, but it sounds like from their site that they just do anthologies.

Another low-paying possibility, Allison, might be FrostFire Worlds-- http://albanlake.com/guidelines-frostfire/
They take stories up to 6000 words and pay $15.
#7 - January 22, 2015, 04:49 PM

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Yes, I do have a Market Guide. Thus, I know about the magazines that have been around for a long time. I must admit I forgot about Centauri! If Cricket doesn't work, I'll try it despite the lower pay.

I started my ghost story as a project with my after school elementary writing club. When it received favorable response, I decided to finish it for the previously mentioned contest. I really enjoyed for once not having to work about length, but of course the downside is trying to find a market.

In the future, I'll need to stay smart about what I write. In other words, either keep it short for the MG market or aim it at an older audience which will accept the longer length. The recent online publications are new to me. I'll keep them in mind as I write other stories.

Again, thanks everyone! Nice to know there are some possibilities.
#8 - January 25, 2015, 04:37 PM

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Since you said you tend to write longer stories, keep in mind the Australian SCHOOL magazine: http://theschoolmagazine.com.au/authors-and-artists/guidelines-for-contributors/writers. They have a word count limit of 2000.

I've sold them several longer stories, and they pay really well. However, the topic has to be something you're sure will translate to Australian culture. I've had good luck with original fairy tales and fairy tale take off, plus a few contemporary stories.
#9 - January 26, 2015, 02:39 PM
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Okay.... I submitted my story to Cricket! If I hear any kind of positive response, I'll let you all know. :cheesy
#10 - January 27, 2015, 06:03 PM

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Sara (and anyone else who can answer),

To make sure your story translated to Australian culture for School Magazine, did you just read back issues or did you research Australia or....? Sorry, if this seems like a dumb question.  :embarrassed2 I have School Magazine in my list of markets and have thought of trying to write for them, but keep feeling hesitant because I am nervous about making it fit another culture.

Allison
#11 - January 27, 2015, 06:07 PM

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I know exactly what you mean, Allison. :) I know little about Australian culture, so most of the stories I send to them (and most of the stories they've accepted) have been fractured or original fairy tales, fantasy stories, or futuristic stories. With those, you don't run into culture differences as much. I think I've only sold them one contemporary story. With that, and really, with all my submissions, I use the internet to double-check on things I'm not sure they have in Australia, or for which they might have a different name. Once, I found an Aussie on these boards to read over my submission. Oh, and I always use the Australian dictionary in the Word program to change American spelling to Australian.
#12 - January 27, 2015, 06:17 PM
"No furniture is so charming as books."
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I've added Frost Fire and Sucker Literary to my market list. Nice to see some print options for young people that accept longer works!
#13 - January 27, 2015, 07:03 PM

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Does anyone know who is the current editor of Cricket magazine? It  was Lonnie Plecha a few years ago, but I'm wondering if he's still there and if not, who is?
#14 - February 14, 2015, 04:01 PM
Sheila Welch,  author/illustrator. Don't Call Me Marda, Waiting to Forget, Something in the Air, The Shadowed Unicorn, Little Prince Know-It-All

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Does anyone know who is the current editor of Cricket magazine? It  was Lonnie Plecha a few years ago, but I'm wondering if he's still there and if not, who is?

Still Lonnie!
#15 - February 16, 2015, 01:37 PM

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Cricket rejected my story. Next best option seems Beyond Centauri. So, that means a rewrite to reduce the word count. I'll keep everyone posted!
#16 - February 19, 2015, 08:49 AM

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Sorry for the R, Allison.  :hug  Wishing you the best with Beyond Centauri.
#17 - February 19, 2015, 05:03 PM

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Actually, my husband thinks I should try School Magazine before Beyond Centauri. Whatever way I go, it means cutting over a thousand words. When I was growing up, my favorite stories were the long ones. Those are still the type I prefer to write. :sigh

The story was my first submit to Cricket. I probably shouldn't be disappointed, but it's also the first story of mine I thought worth submitting to them. Well, at least now, I know how the submission process works. :-\


#18 - February 19, 2015, 05:45 PM

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Thanks for the editor information for Cricket, MMinks.
#19 - February 19, 2015, 08:00 PM
Sheila Welch,  author/illustrator. Don't Call Me Marda, Waiting to Forget, Something in the Air, The Shadowed Unicorn, Little Prince Know-It-All

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