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How do you treat,

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Unknowns within the scope of your narrative?

I find when I write middle grade, I often treat the unknown as something already known but to a select few or a very small culture within the narrative. Or the unknown is an extension from what's already known.
#1 - May 24, 2015, 11:54 AM

I'm sorry--I'm not sure what you're asking. What do you mean by "unknowns"?
#2 - May 25, 2015, 02:20 PM
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Like how is the unknown handled in your story, like the aspect of not knowing. The mystery. The lack of knowledge, the alien and the strange.

Like in my flash fiction, generally the unknown is simply a secret part of the already known.
#3 - May 25, 2015, 03:43 PM

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SarahW, do you mean knowledge that one character has that another doesn't ("Luke, I'm your father"), or knowledge that the reader has that the characters don't? Or do you mean dealing with unfamiliar aspects of world building?

It might help us answer your question if you could give a specific example.  :flowers2
#4 - May 25, 2015, 06:14 PM
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SarahW, do you mean knowledge that one character has that another doesn't ("Luke, I'm your father"), or knowledge that the reader has that the characters don't? Or do you mean dealing with unfamiliar aspects of world building?

It might help us answer your question if you could give a specific example.  :flowers2

Or do you mean the unknowable aspects of the unknown, like God?

I think how you'd handle any of these would depend on the POV you are writing in. First or close third would depend entirely on the character and how he'd handle/react to them. What does he know/believe/think?

Omniscient wouldn't have any unknown, by definition.
#5 - May 26, 2015, 04:02 PM

In my context, generally speaking fear of the unknown like in horror.

My approach being distinct from horror, in that in horror the intent is to terrify. In mine, generally it's more like knowing a personal friend who is terrified (or the MC does anyway.)

There isn't even enough fantasy to really call it overly fantastical, and the horror is character specific that doesn't necessarily happen to the main character them self (at least right away.) Unless have those one off stories, where a horror flash fiction is based on your night terrors. But that's not extremely common, particularly these days.
#6 - May 30, 2015, 03:44 PM
« Last Edit: May 31, 2015, 04:18 PM by SarahW »

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I'll stand by my original answer. It's all about how the characters react to the situation. Be consistent and true to the situation and the people involved.
#7 - June 01, 2015, 07:38 AM

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