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Split infinitive-ly?

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#1 - September 17, 2015, 11:54 AM

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Interesting, Dave--thanks for posting.

I've never liked "hopefully" because it assumes that a state of hope exists, independent of a hoper. "Hopefully, X candidate will win the next presidential election." Who hopes that? Not everybody, certainly.
#2 - September 17, 2015, 01:41 PM
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#3 - September 17, 2015, 03:27 PM

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Very interesting post, David! Thank you so much for sharing it!

Have a wonderful weekend! :)
#4 - September 26, 2015, 06:05 AM

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Interesting, Dave--thanks for posting.

I've never liked "hopefully" because it assumes that a state of hope exists, independent of a hoper. "Hopefully, X candidate will win the next presidential election." Who hopes that? Not everybody, certainly.

The person saying or writing it is the hoper. Nothing independent about it. Hopefully, you understand.
#5 - October 05, 2015, 03:19 PM

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The person saying or writing it is the hoper. Nothing independent about it. Hopefully, you understand.

The Brits have long had the solution: "One hopes..."
#6 - December 20, 2015, 08:01 AM
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Yes! No more fretting about they, their and them!

"The pronouns they/them/their have been used with singular antecedents for centuries. It’s perfectly good English. It sounds completely natural. Great writers like Shakespeare and Austen used it. Does anyone really think Everyone clapped his hands sounds better than Everyone clapped their hands?"

It certainly sounds better than Everyone clapped his and her hands!!!
#7 - December 20, 2015, 08:34 AM

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Great article, Dave! Thanks!  "Hopefully" is passive writing, without a clear subject. Why not just say what you mean, "I hope that..."?
#8 - December 20, 2015, 09:43 AM
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The person saying or writing it is the hoper. Nothing independent about it. Hopefully, you understand.

I'm with you, Debbie. This is how I have always understood it.
#9 - December 20, 2015, 01:13 PM

Someone took photos of agents (editors?) as they held up pieces of paper on which they'd written their pet peeves. One woman wanted all writers to stop using "their" as singular...and then wrote something akin to Shakespeare being dead, get over it.   :whip  She didn't offer suggestions.
#10 - December 20, 2015, 01:42 PM
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Just today I read in Dickens' A Christmas Carol, "Every person has a right to take care of themselves."

So this their as generic possessive has long precedent, if only in dialogue. But then the speaker was one of the three low-lives selling off Scrooge's possessions, so the author may have been making a representation of low-class speech patterns.
#11 - December 20, 2015, 02:38 PM
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When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.
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