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Traditional media - size question for print

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Hello

I sometimes work in watercolor/ink, then scan the work in and add to it in Photoshop. Sometimes, the printed work is larger than the size of the actual work.

This hasn't really been a problem for me so far, I like working small and I scan the art at a high DPI so I can scale it back. Still, reproducing the art at a bigger size enlarges the textures in the brush strokes.

Just wondering, for other published illustrators, how do you go about your traditional pieces? Especially for watercolor?
#1 - March 01, 2016, 12:01 PM
Charlene Chua, illustration | www.charlenechua.com
Twitter: @sygnin Behance: @charlenechua

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I work at actual size, but I know others work larger and reduce digitally. There are fewer resolution issues reducing the size than enlarging.
#2 - March 01, 2016, 01:45 PM
THIS LITTLE PIGGY (AN OWNER'S MANUAL), Aladdin PIX June 2017 :pigsnort
KUNG POW CHICKEN 1-4, Scholastic 2014 :chicken

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I work at actual size, but I know others work larger and reduce digitally. There are fewer resolution issues reducing the size than enlarging.

Ok thanks. It's usually the case I guess, I just don't comfortable working large in watercolor.
#3 - March 01, 2016, 01:59 PM
Charlene Chua, illustration | www.charlenechua.com
Twitter: @sygnin Behance: @charlenechua

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I work larger. At least half again as big as the intended page dimensions, but I also use cold press paper. It's like a bumpy cobblestone path for my paint brushes so if I want detail, which I do, I work larger. But I love it for it's ability to absorb the layers of paint.

I'd imagine less bumpy paper is good for working smaller though. :steamroller
#4 - March 03, 2016, 03:58 PM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
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I work larger. At least half again as big as the intended page dimensions, but I also use cold press paper. It's like a bumpy cobblestone path for my paint brushes so if I want detail, which I do, I work larger. But I love it for it's ability to absorb the layers of paint.

I'd imagine less bumpy paper is good for working smaller though. :steamroller

Thanks for sharing!
#5 - March 03, 2016, 04:22 PM
Charlene Chua, illustration | www.charlenechua.com
Twitter: @sygnin Behance: @charlenechua

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That's interesting, Cyn! I work on hot press (smooth) paper and include lots of detail. I didn't find the cold press worked well with my methods.
#6 - March 03, 2016, 06:02 PM
THIS LITTLE PIGGY (AN OWNER'S MANUAL), Aladdin PIX June 2017 :pigsnort
KUNG POW CHICKEN 1-4, Scholastic 2014 :chicken

http://cyndimarko.com
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There's a lot of critter action and background in your scenes and you amaze me with the ability to work actual size. You must have found a good paper. I'd love to try some really good hot press.

I found my work pooling and not absorbing the layers, plus, I've added gouaches to the mix. Someone told me that they were surprised with my level of saturation on some of the work, but it's that spongy paper. Yeah, cold press makes detail work challenging, so it's biggin's in the rendering department, but I draw pretty large to begin with.
#7 - March 03, 2016, 06:14 PM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

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I use Arches 150lb hot press. Bright white if I can get it. I also use an incredible art board to stretch it on if I'm going to do a lot of wet techniques. Soaks it right up and comes out flat. I've also experimented with adding gouache to the mix as well.

I also tend to sketch smaller, (going from thumbs, to quarter or half size) enlarge in PS and print it off, then polish it up, and use a light box to trace onto the watercolor paper.
#8 - March 04, 2016, 10:14 AM
THIS LITTLE PIGGY (AN OWNER'S MANUAL), Aladdin PIX June 2017 :pigsnort
KUNG POW CHICKEN 1-4, Scholastic 2014 :chicken

http://cyndimarko.com
@cynmarko

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I use Arches 150lb hot press. Bright white if I can get it. I also use an incredible art board to stretch it on if I'm going to do a lot of wet techniques. Soaks it right up and comes out flat. I've also experimented with adding gouache to the mix as well.

I also tend to sketch smaller, (going from thumbs, to quarter or half size) enlarge in PS and print it off, then polish it up, and use a light box to trace onto the watercolor paper.
 

Thank you for sharing about your paper. I'd like to try it. I draw on regular drawing paper too, then scan and print on watercolor paper. Sometimes, I'm just sketching, not planning on something going to finish, and I want to use it. Often when I'm using one of my small pads, I end up taping other papers to my original drawing that may have started as just a head, then I size things in PS before transferring it to the paper.
#9 - March 05, 2016, 07:26 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

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