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Cassiopeia And Kids

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Teachers, parents, anyone....

I read that the constellation young children usually first learn about is Cassiopeia.

True / false?

Are there other constellations that are used as an introduction?

Age range or grade kids are first exposed to this concept these days?

 :thankyou



#1 - March 10, 2016, 06:09 AM
Imagination is more important than knowledge. Einstein.

I learned the Big Dipper first. Then Orion. Then Casseiopia. That was a while ago, though. :) I was pretty young, maybe Kindergarten. My dad had a telescope and we lived in a small town where you could see the stars. I'm not sure how I will teach my child about stars, living in a city like I do now.
#2 - March 10, 2016, 06:27 AM

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We also learned the Big and Little Dipper first. Probably around kindergarten when my older sister was really into a space book. To this day I can find the dippers, but not Cassiopia! :-O
#3 - March 10, 2016, 07:00 AM
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The only one I can find is Orion so that's the one my kids know. I know what the Big and Little Dipper look like in books, but heck if I can find them in the sky.

Also, planets. We can identify Venus, Mars, and Jupiter when visible.
#4 - March 10, 2016, 08:24 AM
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It was the Big Dipper! We used to sleep outside during the hot summer months in India and have fond memories of watching the night sky. My mom taught us how to find the various planets and constellations but Cassiopeia was down the line.

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#5 - March 10, 2016, 09:21 AM
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Big and Little Dipper for me followed by the Pleiades and Orion's belt. The Pleiades were easy for me to find because it is a cluster of small stars.

BTW, I lived in New Zealand for a year and all my classmates pointed out the Southern Cross (which is beautiful). Are you going to consider south-of-the-equator constellations?
#6 - March 10, 2016, 10:21 AM

So far what all of you have said makes more sense than what I read (Big Dipper being first, not Cassiopeia). It didn't sound right when I read it but I couldn't figure out why. (The Little Dunce forgot the Big Dipper!)

I distinctly remember Cassiopeia from grade school, but things are done so differently these days.

(One thing on my bucket list is to look through a NASA telescope...like the Webb telescope. If that ever happened, there would have to be a paramedic close by! A home telescope has been on my list of things to buy.)
#7 - March 10, 2016, 10:21 AM
Imagination is more important than knowledge. Einstein.

Pons, we cross-posted.

At the moment, there is no relevance to location in the story, and only one constellation.
#8 - March 10, 2016, 10:24 AM
Imagination is more important than knowledge. Einstein.

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Oh, I'm sorry. I assumed you were writing a NF ms about constellations. My mistake.   :slaphead
#9 - March 10, 2016, 10:28 AM

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Yep. Big Dipper and Little Dipper here, too. I didn't learn Cassiopiea until I was a teen. I called it The Big W until then.  :lol5

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#10 - March 10, 2016, 12:05 PM
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The Big Dipper was the first one I learned and the only one I really remembered for any length of time. I went to a planetarium fairly regularly, and enjoyed having the constellations pointed out to me, but most of the shapes didn't make sense to me until they connected the dots. The Big Dipper was the only one I could ever find on my own and the only one I tried to make with the glow-in-the-dark star stickers on my ceiling (the rest were randomly placed). It also came up in social studies (history) and music in 5th grade or so when we talked about escaping slaves following "the drinking gourd."
#11 - March 10, 2016, 12:37 PM

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Big Dipper and Orion here too. The thing is, one points to the other. I can't remember how, but that can't be hard to find.
#12 - March 14, 2016, 07:37 AM
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Big Dipper points to Polaris (North Star) which if continued, leads to Cassiopeia. Orion has the distinctive belt stars.

Light pollution definitely causes problems with stargazing in cities. Too bad that many people don't realize that good artificial nighttime lighting can waste less energy, so be cheaper, and allow us to better enjoy the night sky. It's all about the direction the light shines and how much is enough. Ideally light should reflect from objects you want to see, but not shine directly into your eyes, which actually makes it harder to see things.
#13 - March 15, 2016, 11:44 AM

Thank you, everyone.  ;D

Spence-B: If you have some knowledge to share about binos/tripods and telescopes for sky gazing, may I PM you? After basic research, I'm waffling. I've brought my expectations back down to ground level yet think I might be disappointed with the equipment I am (kind of) leaning toward. (My husband will definitely be disappointed, but to WOW him like he wants to be wowed...I'd have break open my piggy-bank. And his.)
#14 - March 15, 2016, 04:58 PM
Imagination is more important than knowledge. Einstein.

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Arona, I'm not sure I have PM privileges. You can write to me via email.
#15 - March 16, 2016, 06:43 AM
« Last Edit: March 16, 2016, 08:53 AM by HDWestlund »

Hi Spence and Arona, I modified Spence's post to remove his email address from a board that it open to the internet. Arona, if you would like to take Spence up on his generous offer, please use the contact a moderator button to ask us to give Spence your email address. (We are happy to do this for members who do not yet have PM privileges, to protect their email privacy.) ::-)
#16 - March 16, 2016, 08:55 AM

Done!

 :thankyou
#17 - March 16, 2016, 09:24 AM
Imagination is more important than knowledge. Einstein.

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