SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Scanners

Discussion started on

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
I have a Canon pixma 3 in 1 printer/scanner. It works fine for scanning anything that fits on the scanner in one piece. However if I try to scan a two page spread, I find it very challenging to stitch the images back together in Photoshop - there is a shadowing on one side of the scan so the two never match up nicely. It's especially difficult with plain white background.

Is this a photoshop skill I need to continue working on or a scanner issue (that an upgrade would fix)?

I work mostly traditionally, but enjoy tweaking or playing with composition in Photoshop.
#1 - March 28, 2016, 06:53 AM
https://marlalesage.com/
PIRATE YEAR ROUND (Acorn Press, 2019)

Marla

I'm sure most people have the same issues scanning oversized work. Couple things that helped me; When you scan your image make sure it is as flat as possible, I keep my hand pressed down on the scanner lid to ensure the surface is as flat as possible, especially where the shadowing usually occurs. I think the shadowing happens when there is a gap or space between the art surface and the glass. Typically it's never going to be perfect so that's where Photoshop comes in.

When I scan large images, I make sure that I scan the pieces with plenty of overlap. So in case of your spread, I may scan it in three pieces, left, right, and middle. This will give me room to play and adjust in PS. To do the actual "stitching" of the sections, I line up the sections in their general positions as best as I can and to fine tune it I reduce the opacity of the top layer and use the warp tool to finesse it to match up as close to the bottom layer as possible. Once I have it lined up the way I want, I use my eraser tool and erase out the hard edges of the top layer. creating a seamless blend with the bottom layer.

With any shadowy areas I might have, I lasso the area and use level adjustments. Then I blend it with with either eraser or brush.

Hope that helps.
#2 - March 28, 2016, 10:23 AM

I draw stuff for chocolates.
Member
Poster Plus
Physically, a large format scanner is best. Second best is a smaller scanner with a flat scan bed. Many scanners have a lip around the glass that causes shadowing and distortion of oversized images.

I have a small scanner with a deep lip. I paint large images. The way I work around the physical limitations is to scan the images in pieces, cutting off the area that falls into shadow because of the scanner lip. Some images I scan in 4 pieces, some in 6 or more. I make sure there is plenty of overlap in each scan.

There is a neat function in Photoshop called photomerge. You can find in under the File pull down menu in the Automate heading near the bottom of the menu list. Google it or look on Adobe's website for best practices to use it. (Photomerge does have limitations and works best stitching together 4 or fewer pieces, but if I have a large number of scans, I do the photomerge in batches.)
#3 - March 29, 2016, 05:32 AM
patreon.com/wendymartin
Animal Totem Mandala 2016
The Story Circle 2016 (PiƱata)
Color and Conjure 2017 (Llewellyn)

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
Thanks for the tips! I finally figured out something that works.
#4 - April 04, 2016, 04:08 PM
https://marlalesage.com/
PIRATE YEAR ROUND (Acorn Press, 2019)

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.