SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

concussions

Discussion started on

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region wwa
Anyone know if you would take meds for a concussion?     :paperbag

Also, can you eat solids WITH a feeding tube or do you only have the feeding tube to get your nutrients? And does a feeding tube go into the stomach? Or how does that look?
Thanks for any info on this.
#1 - July 24, 2017, 11:08 AM
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 11:16 AM by hairaplenty »

Member
Poster Plus
Not sure about the feeding tube questions, but can address the one about concussions. The need for medication would depend upon the nature of the concussion and its effects. For instance, if the concussion led to a seizure or bleeding on the brain, medication may be necessary.

My daughter suffered a concussion when she was six or seven (thanks to little brother + metal bat...yikes!). The doctor's prescription was three days resting and quiet play.

You might try the Mayo Clinic site for details. It's this hypochondriac's go-to source for all things medical.  :blushgirl

#2 - July 24, 2017, 12:49 PM

Admins and Mods Emeriti
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region midatlantic
My daughter had three concussions last year.  New treatment protocols are being developed all the time and there's also a lot of disagreement between doctors, and thus treatments range widely.  For example, some doctors prescribe bedrest with very limited screen and reading time, basically lying around in a dark room; but other doctors disagree that that's important. 

Concussions range from mild to very damaging.  If this is for a book, you probably need to figure out how bad you want the concussion to be and then research accordingly.
#3 - July 24, 2017, 01:07 PM
BUSY-EYED DAY (Beach Lane Books, 2018)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
VAMPIRINA AT THE BEACH (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
among others

Reader, reader, reader...
Administrator
Poster Plus
  • ****
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region rmc
If it's a nasal feeding tube, you cannot eat solids with it in (because it goes down your esophagus). But if it goes in through your stomach, you can (in fact, they might start someone with a stomach tube until their swallowing improves and then move them to solids while the tube is still in). I learned all this first-hand when my dad was recovering from open heart surgery. He had the nasal-laryngeal tube first and then the stomach tube to work on swallowing. They have to keep the stomach tube in for a few weeks (not sure why), but he only used it for a few days.
#4 - July 24, 2017, 02:37 PM
Robin
Teen Books A Guide for Families (Vol. 1&2): https://www.amazon.com/s?field-keywords=robin+prehn
My Blog: http://robinellen.livejournal.com

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Moderator
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region longislandny
My daughter had a very mild concussion last year. Whether bed rest is called for depends on severity. If you think of the brain as a muscle, you'll understand the need to immobilize it after a concussion. It needs to rest and heal without constantly being asked to do stuff.

I see no reason a feeding tube would be called for unless the person suffered more severe brain damage or was unconscious at the time.
#5 - July 24, 2017, 06:16 PM

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region midatlantic
I had a concussion (along with stitches in the back of my head) when I was a kid. Failed attempt at acrobatics. I didn't have any meds except for some higher strength Tylenol.  Not a severe concussion by any means, however they told my mother, in front of me, that if my eyes dilated or if I started vomiting that it could be a sign of a worse concussion.
I didn't know what 'eyes dilated' meant so I spent half of the next morning staring at my eyes in the mirror.  :-)
#6 - July 24, 2017, 06:23 PM

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region ireland
Speaking as an epileptic, whenever I have suffered concussion medication has never been administered. I have ended up in A&E on monitoring but never given medication.
Often they advise to keep hydrated and to sit up as the flow of blood to your head is better. On a few occasions I've been given a mask to breathe easier but that's rare.
Usually it's plenty of rest with legs out straight and no sudden movement.
And plenty of water. :wc :wc
#7 - July 25, 2017, 01:25 AM

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region wwa
Thank you all so much! As usual the boards are the place to go for odd and unusual questions. So I have to take this a step further with the feeding tube question.
If a person is considered terminal, and is not able to take in food very well, would they then have a nasal tube? Sounds like the stomach is to promote swallowing and eventually going on your own, but if terminal, they would probably just put one in the nose? Any information or experience with this is greatly appreciated.         :slingshot
#8 - July 25, 2017, 08:49 AM

I had a mild concussion from falling on the ice and hitting the back of my head. I followed instructions that I'd always read from my kids' sports info. Concussions are scary as I didn't know I had one until 24 hours later. I rested as much as I could, but did regular activity too. What surprised me was how tired I was and this all lasted for a good 10 days. I'm not sure about the med question. But talk to someone who has had one. They are a different type of "not feeling good".

Ree
#9 - July 25, 2017, 12:36 PM

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Moderator
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region longislandny
Many times, if the person is terminal they won't have a feeding tube at all. This decision is up to the family unless a living will or other document specifies the person's wishes. I have no info on tube types. I hope this helps.
#10 - July 25, 2017, 09:17 PM

Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
Concussions - any activity that causes symptoms (headache/dizzyness) should be avoided until 100% symptom-free.  Definitely a range of severity. Even those with mild concussion might take Tylenol to ease headache. Quiet, dark room, no reading, etc. 

NG tubes - I had a kid (cancer survivor) tell me this summer that she had an NG (in the nose, empties to the stomach) just for taking her pills. She still ate by mouth which caused some problems because certain foods would stick to the tube. But she refused to swallow pills/liquid medications & was perfectly content with the tube in her nose.  Her mother was slightly disturbed by this but was ok once she realized they'd no longer fight about medication. 
Those requiring a longer-term solution might have a tube that goes directly to the stomach or small intestine  - usually a PEG or Button (inserted through the abdominal wall). For some this is there sole method of feeding, for others it is supplemental because they are unable to eat enough by mouth. They might be fed via syringe or a pump.  A special formula used for this type of nutrition.

Is it the same character with the concussion that requires a tube?  Why?  In the medical world if it is more than just a mild concussion (ie bleed, etc) we'd go straight to the terminology Head Injury or Traumatic Brain Injury. (Although a concussion is a mild head injury).

As far as the terminal question... it depends on how terminal they are. If death is imminent they likely would not be fed at all, just kept comfortable with pain meds, etc. If they cannot be cured but death is not imminent & they cannot eat they would have a tube.  NG is generally short term & a surgical PEG or button would be for a longer term solution (days/weeks vs months).  There are many palliative patients who may not die for years. I worked at a children's hospital & the palliative unit was for any child with a disease that would eventually cause death & is not curable even if those children might live 5,10,15 years. I currently work for an adult client with a life-ending disease. We do not know how long the client will live it could be this year, it could be years from now.   Generally when we think of terminal/palliative patients we think of those actively dying who only have weeks/months to live but this is not always the case.
#11 - July 26, 2017, 05:41 AM

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region wwa
Wow! Thanks to everyone for your experiences and input.

Marla-lesage, Your comments, in particular, tell me your are a nurse/NP/Doctor.
It's two different characters. One with the concussion and the other one with leukemia and it has resurfaced after remission. He is choosing to not continue the fight, with chemo/radiation but, I guess I gave him a feeding tube for comfort. So, I guess it would be different for everyone on how long they would survive if they chose not to continue the life saving meds?
I gave the concussion character some of the same after affects that the actual concussion would give. Obviously he is not on bed rest, since that would be a boring book, but he is actively searching for his girlfriend.
Really good feedback and I thank you to one and all.
#12 - July 26, 2017, 10:51 PM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.