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Why No 3D Rendered Art in Books

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Good Morning All
Over the past year I have asked many public web groups why publishers shy away from printing children's books with high quality 3D rendered images as of now no one really has a solid answer. Could any of you experienced illustrators point to a reason why 2D CGI is fine but 3D CGI is bad form?
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Dr CJ
#1 - September 29, 2017, 11:20 PM

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Picture book art, like all other art has seasons and styles. Most recent styles have been minimalist and less rendered. That said, if the art is superb, age appropriate and fits a story, there is no reason why #D CGI art wouldn't be used. From what I can see of the current market, most 3D CGI is licensed merchandise books from popular movies.
#2 - September 30, 2017, 05:39 AM
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From what I can see of the current market, most 3D CGI is licensed merchandise books from popular movies.

Which might be one reason why trade books don't have much (any?) 3D art at this time, to differentiate them from licensed books and other types of entertainment. Just a guess.

There's a lot of pull for tv/movies/cartoons, so for picture books and other illustrated books to stand out, they need to look different. Otherwise, why buy a book about characters you don't know when you could buy a book with a licensed character that you do know? There has to be a reason for the unknown book/character to stand out, and with illustrated books, the art is the thing that can make it look different than what is out there in other mediums and licensed books. Also, when people are paying $15-20 for a picture book, they might be looking for art that doesn't look like licensed art (when those books usually cost less).

Again, just a guess.
#3 - September 30, 2017, 12:54 PM
« Last Edit: September 30, 2017, 01:00 PM by Stephanie Ruble »
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Regarding the lack of 3D rendering, there is a certain coldness that quality digitally produced imagery can often have - looks more like a group of artists produced the work rather than an individual who crafted the work. I wrote an article about the dramatic amount of whiteness and minimalism in children's books for my local paper and posted it on my blog:[/url]https://duncanweller1.blogspot.ca/2017/08/the-incredible-whiteness-of-childrens.html   
#4 - December 04, 2017, 08:43 AM

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In my experience, rendered 3D is still used in non fiction books, especially those for the education market. You'll see plenty of history books especially in this style, when the publisher wants realism. However as a videogames player (as are the main audience of these books - children and younger teens), I've never seen a children's 3D rendered book that didn't look as though it had been produced with the absolute minimum of money spent on 3D assets, and also without individual artistic vision and flair, which is sad because the online communities are crammed with exceptional 3D artists who could produce photorealistic art in this style.
#5 - March 22, 2018, 12:23 AM

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