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Should I mention standards in cover letter?

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If my book addresses a specific standard, should I mention this in the cover letter?

In this case it's a less-known standard - part of Engineering Design Practice in the Next Generation Science Standards - so it's not quite as simple as saying "aligns with Common Core." (In fact, one of my selling points is that there aren't many books out there addressing this standard yet.) I feel like even including the phrase "Next Generation Science Standards" is so wordy! Given that this is for a call specifically for STEM books, would they likely know what I mean if I simply say NGSS? (My academic training is glaring at me for even considering using an acronym without properly introducing it first, but this isn't a scientific paper...)
#1 - March 29, 2018, 09:52 AM

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Hehe. Yup your academic underpants are showing :grin3  I recommend using the full NGSS and put the acronym in parenthesis so that you can use it again if need be. Best of luck, V.
#2 - March 29, 2018, 11:29 AM
BOUND (Bodach Books, 2018)
TEN EASTER EGGS (Scholastic, 2015)
www.vijayabodach.blogspot.com
Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces

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Thanks! I will use the full thing, mouthful that it is.

Since I have curriculum development experience, would it be appropriate to mention that I could write lesson plans to go along with the book? Or is that something most publishers would rather deal with in-house (if at all)?
#3 - March 29, 2018, 03:00 PM

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If it's a STEM call, they may be thrilled that you know the standards, but if it's not an educational publisher, it may not matter. If it is, they may recognize that you hit the standard without being told. If you use the standards, write it out.

Mentioning briefly in your bio that you have experience developing curriculum is enough. You can discuss this further if/when you get the acceptance.
#4 - March 29, 2018, 08:35 PM
Website: http://www.debbievilardi.com/
Twitter: @dvilardi1

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I agree with Vijaya. Write Next Generation Science Standards. In my district we like to call them Next Gen Science Stuff, but don't say that.  :lol4 I love that you are writing about engineering design.  Thank you for filling a gap!

Good luck.

Jody
#5 - March 29, 2018, 08:59 PM
MOSTLY THE HONEST TRUTH (HarperCollins 3/12/2019)
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Publishers appreciate knowing what their authors specialize in, so it's good to mention your experience in curriculum development your bio. Some publishers do this in-house, but I've often seen authors create their own teacher's pages on their personal website. Good luck!
#6 - March 30, 2018, 07:48 AM
BOUND (Bodach Books, 2018)
TEN EASTER EGGS (Scholastic, 2015)
www.vijayabodach.blogspot.com
Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces

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Thanks, this is all very useful! :D
#7 - April 01, 2018, 06:33 PM

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You've already gotten good advice, so let me just add good luck!  :goodluck
#8 - April 01, 2018, 09:20 PM
Learning to Swear in America (Bloomsbury, July 2016)
What Goes Up (Bloomsbury, 2017)
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