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Weak words

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Would verbs ending in ly be considered weak?

Quickly
Swiftly
Warily  etc.

Thank you!

#1 - August 26, 2018, 05:03 AM
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Good morning! These are adverbs, and they can be used to modify a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. In many cases, an adverb + verb or adverb + adjective can be replaced with a stronger verb or adjective.

Example: “Philbert quickly rode down the street on his very old bicycle”
could be changed to “Philbert dashed down the street on his antique bicycle.”

I hope you find this very helpful. (No, wait — I hope you find it indispensable!)
#2 - August 26, 2018, 06:18 AM
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Some people dislike adverbs intensely and feel they should be removed from every piece of writing. I think they're a good tool for your toolbox. Use them carefully as you'd use any other word.
#3 - August 26, 2018, 06:47 AM
VAMPIRINA IN THE SNOW (Disney-Hyperion, 2018)
BUSY-EYED DAY (Beach Lane Books, 2018)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
among others

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Yes I have read spirited posts about how they are  "lazy".  Thank you for the balanced answer.
#4 - August 26, 2018, 07:08 AM
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Some people dislike adverbs intensely and feel they should be removed from every piece of writing. I think they're a good tool for your toolbox. Use them carefully as you'd use any other word.

This.
#5 - August 26, 2018, 10:55 AM

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But it is different with picture books, right? 

She ran quickly.

She ran.

Every word in a PB must bleed if taken out. Right?
#6 - August 26, 2018, 05:42 PM
« Last Edit: August 27, 2018, 03:07 AM by jojocookie »
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I don't think it's different in picture books. Every word of every piece has to do it job.

Running implies quickness, but ran could be weak on its own. It doesn't present much of an image. (Of course, in picture books, the image could replace the weak words.) Whether changing the word helps the story, depends on the story. Think about how the words below impact how you imagine the line.

She raced.
She sped.
#7 - August 27, 2018, 05:50 PM
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Thank you everyone!!!  :yourock
#8 - August 28, 2018, 03:52 AM
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I don't think it's different in picture books. Every word of every piece has to do it job.
:exactly
Running implies quickness, but ran could be weak on its own. It doesn't present much of an image. (Of course, in picture books, the image could replace the weak words.) Whether changing the word helps the story, depends on the story.
Yes, changing the word depends on the story. Ran is not necessarily weak on its own; it is weak or strong depending on what words (and images for pb) surround it. The brevity of She ran. can have great impact if it follows a more lengthy passage, for instance:
The bear stood, raised its front legs, and ripped the air with its claws. Its huge mouth opened, showing gleaming, dripping fangs. ROAR!
She ran.

This thread reminded me of a famous bit of editing in a scene in Thomas Hardy's TESS OF THE D'UBERVILLES.  The scene is where the scoundrel Alec d'Uberville watches young Tess as he plots to seduce her:
"Tess still stood hesitating like a bather about to make his plunge, hardly knowing whether to retreat or to persevere, when a figure came forth from the dark triangular door of the tent. It was that of a tall young man, smoking."
Hardy originally wrote the italicized line as It was that of a tall young man, smoking a cigarette. (Or maybe it was cigar.) His editor recommended losing the last two words. Zowie! What an impact!
#9 - August 28, 2018, 11:44 AM
« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 11:47 AM by Vonna »
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 :exactly
#10 - August 28, 2018, 12:02 PM
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Vonna,

I ADORE your "she ran" example.

AM
#11 - August 28, 2018, 01:19 PM
VAMPIRINA IN THE SNOW (Disney-Hyperion, 2018)
BUSY-EYED DAY (Beach Lane Books, 2018)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
among others

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 :thanx
#12 - September 01, 2018, 06:12 AM
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Independent Publisher Gallery
KidLit Agents/Editors @ Conferences, Workshops/Retreats/Online Workshops
twitter @VonnaCarter

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