SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Illustration Paper Help

Discussion started on

New Poster
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region wisconsin
I was wondering if there is a preferred paper choice for illustrators mainly working with watercolor. I like how cold press produces bright colors and crisp lines, but because of the rougher texture of the paper it does not scan well for book illustrations. I know hot press has a smooth finish, but I don't like how it seems to bleed and the colors are not as vibrant. Is there a different type of paper I should be trying? How do illustrators achieve the bright colors and crisp lines in their work?

Also looking for ways to achieve the bold black lines as well, I've used Pigma Micron ink pens but is there a better method?

Thank you for your help!!
#1 - September 25, 2018, 08:59 AM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
I've never noticed a difference in the brightness of the colour between cold press & hot press. I've heard there is a way to scan your work in two directions & then merge to get rid of the shadows from the texture but haven't figured out how to do that. Lots of tutorials if you google it. ie: http://kidlitartists.blogspot.com/2014/12/removing-texture-from-watercolor-scans.html .
I used Canson XL mixed media paper for my graphic novel  sample pages - it's cheap & has a bit of texture but I really enjoyed working with it. I didn't have too much issue with the texture scanning. I'm pretty sure I just adjusted the levels in photoshop until it mostly disappeared.
#2 - September 25, 2018, 05:36 PM
https://marlalesage.com/
Pirate, year round 2019 Acorn Press

Illustrator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region ksmo
You might be able to fiddle with the saturation, levels, color balance, etc. in Photoshop once you scan it.  That way you might be able to compensate for any shortcomings in the media you choose. 
#3 - October 18, 2018, 07:58 PM
Karen B. Jones

Administrator
Poster Plus
  • ****
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region dakotas
Photoshop. :)

I'm using hot press because things are nice and smooth (I do ink and watercolor). But then I totally bump the colors in Photoshop. My basic materials are just not that special, but if I end up with a nice digital picture in the end, I'm satisfied.
#4 - October 18, 2018, 08:02 PM

New Poster
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sfnortheastbay
anyone know of the best way to have scanned drawings printed on watercolor paper (when not owning a large printer, personally)
#5 - October 22, 2018, 07:23 AM

Illustrator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region ksmo
Find a print shop that does giclee prints.  I've also seen it referred to as archival printing on watercolor paper.  I've had it done at a local printing shop before, but they're not in business anymore.  I've also seen it offered on online printing shops.  But expect it to be pricier than a regular print.  It has to be done on a special, wide-format printer, apparently.  (Sorry, I know very little about the process.)

Google it with the keywords:  giclee printing. 

Good luck! 
#6 - October 22, 2018, 06:26 PM
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 06:30 PM by karen-b-jones »
Karen B. Jones

Rock of The Westies
Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region nevada
  • SCBWI PAL
Always a bit late to respond. I use cold press / Langton Prestige . I love it because I can keep layering without the work puddling or muddying up as I use mixed media of watercolor and gouache.  My drawings start out on regular drawing paper, then I clean up in PS and print on my Epson Stylus Pro, which has a setting for watercolor so the ink doesn't bleed when it gets wet. This works really well when my originals have been shaded a lot and I've put some major details into the drawings that I don't want to lose. I can print up to 17 inches wide and any length, so this is a good option for me as I work larger for extra detail, especially when working with the texture of the cold press.  Scans aren't an issue as I use Photoshop in the last part of the process to get the colors back to the original.  One nice thing about working with traditional mediums, is you can sell your original works, as I've sold quite a few of my illustrator postcard originals. There are collectors who are quite enthused to find some of us are still favoring using traditional mediums.
#7 - November 19, 2018, 06:35 PM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.