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Difference between Magazine and PB text

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Hello all,
I am taking an online course. I am required to read and critique others' work including PB to YA. I write YA. I read tons of PBs as a PreK teacher, but haven't really delved into writing or thinking what makes a good PB other than how it works in my classroom.
The recent PB text I am critiquing makes me think it is more on the Magazine front, but I'm not sure why. It reads a little "slight," to me. But not sure what exactly I am looking for in critiquing and giving the author good feedback.
So, what do you think the difference is between mags and PB's?
#1 - October 06, 2018, 11:52 AM

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One factor to consider is whether or not the story 'works' if it just has one or two illustrations. If it does, then there's a good chance it's a magazine story.
#2 - October 06, 2018, 12:46 PM

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Oh, yes. Good point. Thanks, Ev.
#3 - October 06, 2018, 12:58 PM

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Magazine story text often reads more like a novel.
#4 - October 06, 2018, 02:22 PM
VAMPIRINA IN THE SNOW (Disney-Hyperion, 2018)
BUSY-EYED DAY (Beach Lane Books, 2018)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
among others

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Hair, if the text feels slight to you, you're probably looking at a magazine piece (though I must say some of the best magazine pieces are not in the least bit slight; in contrast some PBs fall in that category but I'm not naming names). A PB has to have weight for repeated readings, a surprise or emotion that wells up and overflows.  And of course, Ev mentioned the most important point--does it have enough different picturable scenes for a PB.

To get a better feel for the magazines, pick up Highlights or Cricket or Jack-n-Jill, whatever is available at your library.
#5 - October 06, 2018, 02:50 PM
BOUND (Bodach Books, 2018)
TEN EASTER EGGS (Scholastic, 2015)
www.vijayabodach.blogspot.com
Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces

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I knew I'd get great feedback here!!!     :thankyou5
#6 - October 06, 2018, 02:53 PM

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What Ev said: are there at least 16 different scenes to illustrate? (That's one per full spread; some have many more than that.) If you don't have enough pictures to do a whole 32 page book, then I think it's a magazine story.
#7 - October 06, 2018, 03:50 PM

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Another thing to look at as how much is told. If  a piece describes the visuals in each scene in words and that style seems to be working, there is a good chance it's written as a magazine piece. A PB author has to leave room for the illustrator. Some pieces can be tweaked to work as either. For a PB, each scene needs to have action with a new character, setting, or action introduced---that's what gets illustrated.
#8 - October 06, 2018, 06:21 PM
Website: http://www.debbievilardi.com/
Twitter: @dvilardi1

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