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Copying Style. Giving Credit to Original artist

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With all this isolation I have started illustrating my children’s book.  I was searching esty for inspiration and came across one piece of art I adored.  I am going to use it as an inspiration for my entire book.  I wanted people’s opinion on how to handle it with the original illustrator.  I want to give her credit or reach out to her.  I will not be using her exact work but very much so her style. 
Thanks!
#1 - March 27, 2020, 07:44 PM

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Hi Laura.  If you are being "inspired" by an Illustrators work, that's fine, so long as it's not actual copying. But if you could put your art and her's side by side and see a marked similarity, then no.
#2 - March 28, 2020, 03:00 AM
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Thanks.  Any thoughts on reaching out to the original artist to offer some sort of compensation?
#3 - March 28, 2020, 12:13 PM

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Hi Laura,
Unless the artist you are inspired by is selling her illustration services, artwork, etc. online, I would not reach out to her. I would do as Chris suggests and use her work as inspiration, but if you are copying characters, colors, etc., then I would just not do that.
#4 - March 28, 2020, 01:04 PM
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It's perfectly fine to create work in the style of someone else. This is how subgenres sometimes form. Think about spaghetti westerns or noir. Knives Out is in the style of Agatha Christie. Problems occur when you cross the line to copyright infringement.

Ask yourself this question: would you prefer to have that illustrator work on your book? If not, why not? What makes the work you are doing yours? Focus on those parts.

This doesn't mean you can't copy the illustration as an exercise to absorb the style more fully before you process it into something uniquely yours, just that you can't sell that copy.(Authors are told to type out picture books to get a better sense of the flow and why a book works. This would be the same.) Inspiration is not imitation, it's flattery.
#5 - March 28, 2020, 08:34 PM
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