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Do illustrators/agents prefer specifics throughout entire PB?

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Hello! I have a PB manuscript and use descriptive language throughout most of the book to paint specific images in the eyes of the illustrator/listener/reader. However, I left my ending pretty vague to give room for the illustrator's imagination or the listener/reader. Is the vague ending a big NO-NO?

My ending is this:
So appreciative was Gator
That his friends helped him in stride
He transformed his shoes into thank you gifts
To use on their travels worldwide.

Basically....should I be specific about the 'gifts'?

Thanks in advance for any feedback!!

-Brittany   :thankyou
#1 - July 14, 2020, 10:24 AM
Brittany Naumann

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:welcome Brittany. It's great that you are leaving room for the illustrator to interpret it how he or she wishes. I find that they always have their own vision of the text and they add so much more than what I could've imagined. It's quite delightful. The only time I add art notes is if it's absolutely necessary. We need a :gator smiley.
#2 - July 14, 2020, 12:37 PM
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Hi Brittany, I'll echo what Vijaya said...nope, you don't need to specify what you mean.
#3 - July 14, 2020, 02:58 PM
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It's always best not to be prescriptive in the text unless those details are important to the understanding of the story.
#4 - July 14, 2020, 05:57 PM
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Following on from what Debbie said, I always find it a revelation to pick a favorite published picture book, type out its words, and read them back from the printed A4 page. It really shows how much the illustrations are relied on to tell half the story!
#5 - July 15, 2020, 05:05 PM
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I always find it a revelation to pick a favorite published picture book, type out its words, and read them back from the printed

This. So instructive! Tt gives you a feel for the pacing when you type out your own stories.

#6 - July 15, 2020, 06:02 PM
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Agreeing here. There are times where Illo notes can be needed for both Agent/Editor and Illustrator but they are usually  few and far between. They would be necessary if, for example, the text said "June was just SOooooo excited about dressing up for the party" and the intention is sarcasm, you mean for June to look furious about having to dress up.
In your example about the gifts though, if the Illustrator is struggling to come up with enough idea's for what items to draw,  he/she can consult with the Art Director for suggestions.
#7 - July 16, 2020, 03:29 AM
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