ABOUT ROBERT MEGANCK

  • Robert Meganck is Professor Emeritus of Communication
    Arts/VCU where taught classes in graphic design, illustration, color theory and digital imaging. 
    He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Robert has received over 300 regional, national and international awards for his research and professional practice in illustration and graphic design, and been recognized for excellence by such organizations as The Society of Illustrators New York, The Society of Illustrators Los Angeles, American Illustration and The Illustrators Club of Washington DC, Maryland and Virginia. His work has been included in a variety of national reviews including Communication Arts Magazine’s Illustration and Design Annuals, American Illustration Annuals, Print Magazine’s Regional Design
    Annuals, The Society of Illustrators Annuals, and 3×3 The Magazine of Contemporary Illustration. His Clients include: Picture Window Books, K-12, Spider Magazine, Cricket Magazine, The Washington Post, The Progressive, U.S. News and World Report, The New Republic, The Boston Globe, The Washington City Paper, Governing Magazine, Newsweek International, Prentice Hall, The Harvard Business Review, and Virginia Living Magazine. His digital work has been the subject of feature articles in Design, the Society of News Design’s Quarterly Journal, e-Design magazine, and Computer Art magazine. Style Weekly (September 5, 2007) named Robert Meganck one of Richmond’s top 25 most influential
    artists.

ARTIST STATEMENT

  • Statement on Professional Practice


    Professionally and educationally we often make a distinction between graphic design and illustration. I do not. I am, for lack of a better term, a designer who likes to draw pictures. Drawing is basically mark-making. When those marks are for the purpose of communication, they become an illustration. Illustration is simply drawing with a point (to explain). Design in not a product, it is a process – a plan we use to solve a given problem, whether it be the design of a building or how to bake a cake. So in the broad sense, we are all designers, it is just that some of us specialize in specific complex processes and are contracted by others to guide them through the process. The manifestations that result in a building, a dress, or a poster are not designs, they are physical manifestations of the design process.  Illustration, on the other hand, is both a process and a product. To illustrate means to explain, and one can use the physical product of an illustration to assist with the explanation. It is my belief that all illustrators (or at least the good ones) are all designers, as they go through a problem-solving process while they are in the process of completing an illustration. One cannot be a good illustrator unless they are also a good designer, and one cannot be a good graphic designer unless their goal is to explain.

     

    The professional bridge I choose to build is one that links type with image. I believe that both word and image are basic to human communication, and that the two can have the greatest impact when they are considered jointly.

     

    Every experience you have, every book you read, every song you listen to, every place you visit, and every activity you engage in becomes a part of who you are. No two people have the exact same set of experiences. This makes every one of us unique, and we each need to take full advantage of our uniqueness. It’s not the amount of information that sets us apart as individuals, it’s knowing what to do with it. To be creative, you need to simply recapture the imagination that came so easily when you were a child. And in that sense, creative people never grow up.

     

    All of us begin as members of a cover band, but at some point you need to start to write your own songs. We learn our craft from those who came before us. Most of us start off imitating the work of others, then move onto interpreting the work of others, then move to being influenced by the work of others, before we become the innovators of original work.

PUBLICATIONS - View in Bookstore


  • Magazine Articles
  • Book Cover

    Cowboy Art

    (Illustration)


    Spider

    2010

  • Book Cover

    Honk

    (Illustration)


    2011

  • Book Cover

    How Big Bear Stuck to the Sky

    (Illustration)


    Spider

    2011

  • Book Cover

    How Big Bear Stuck to the Sky

    (Illustration)


    Spider

    2011

  • Book Cover

    Pirates

    (Illustration)


    Spider

    2014

  • Book Cover

    Treasure Island

    (Illustration)


    2015

  • Book Cover

    Vikings

    (Illustration)


    Spider

    2013