ABOUT THE BOOK:

Author(s): Peggy King Anderson
Publisher: Indiana Historical Society Press
ISBN-13: ISBN-13: 9780871954244 (hardback) 9780871954251 (paperback)

Two-Moon Journey

The Potawatomi Trail of Death

Synopsis:

What if you were 11 years-old and government soldiers marched into your family’s village and made you leave, along with all of your family and friends? This is exactly what happens to Simu-quah, a Potawatomi girl from the Great Lakes region of Indiana. The year is 1838, and the Forced Removal of Indian tribes has begun. Simu-quah’s father is placed in a jail cage with the other chiefs of her people, and as their two-month forced journey begins, Simu-quah begins to hate the soldier who is so cruel to him. .She also struggles to free her imprisoned father, and other tribal chiefs so they can lead her people back to their homelands in Indiana, at the time of the 1838 Indian Removal. When her plan fails, and her tribe is force-marched 660 miles by US soldiers, Simu-quah finds a surprising way to save her people and to give them hope at the end of their journey.
45

Read My Bio


Karen Williams said on 11/10/2018:
Love what this book is about. Living in Oklahoma, I have Cherokee friends whose ancestors's experienced the Trail of Tears when they were transplanted by force to Oklahoma.
Holly Cupala said on 11/09/2018:
We are so excited for this book, Peggy! I bought a copy for the school and need you to sign it, then I gave mine to my best friend, so I need another! Hugs.
Kathleen Lapi said on 11/07/2018:
This was heartwarming, exciting, and spiritual all at once! A great read!
Elizabeth Varadan said on 11/02/2018:
This sounds like an important addition to any school library or classroom library. This is an issue that seldom is dealt with and is such a tragic part of our country's history.
Nancy Monroe said on 10/31/2018:
An absolutely amazing story of love, trial, sharing, division, unity, and forgiveness. All of our emotions are pulled into this story and our history comes alive in the telling of this journey. It is a must-read for all, no matter the age. It is about our humanity and our ultimately, of our coming together in peace as one. Thank you, Peggy King Anderson for bringing this to us and for sharing your heart.
Crystal Pham said on 10/29/2018:
A beautiful way to draw attention to an important part of our history.
Paula said on 10/28/2018:
I can imagine the terrible experience
Susan Campbell said on 10/28/2018:
This is a great site. I'm glad you're able to reach so many people with the story of the removal of an entire village of people, including my ancestors, from Indiana to Kansas. Migwetch!
Trey Hays said on 10/27/2018:
Wow! What an interesting book this must be!
eileen schnabel said on 10/27/2018:
What a moving and important story. I had heard of the 'trail of tears' but not this. I hope teachers encourage their students to read this! I also thought the road sign designed by the author's son was a BRILLIANT idea.
Jill Hedgecock said on 10/25/2018:
Such a tragic point in our history. Thanks for writing a book about it.
Diana Psyras said on 10/25/2018:
Thank you! I learned some new Native American history!
Linda said on 10/25/2018:
Amazing to travel along the Trail of Death with a group of Potawatomi, and see their enthusiastic response to this book.
Sarah Maury Swan said on 10/25/2018:
We just toured the American Indian Museum in Washington, D.C. and were astounded by the wealth of information they presented. The subject of your book will fit right in. I do hope the Smithsonian know about it.
RJ Mirabal said on 10/25/2018:
A point of view not often seen. Great idea!
Lisa L. Owens said on 10/25/2018:
I'm so happy you wrote this book, Peggy, especially knowing your very personal inspiration for it. Congratulations!
Patti Wisnom said on 10/25/2018:
This is a compelling story that successfully portrays a very sad part of history.
Kay Phillips said on 10/25/2018:
A very sad and compelling story.
Marcia Strykowski said on 10/25/2018:
Sounds interesting. Good luck, Peggy!
Mike Monroe said on 10/24/2018:
Fantastic, compelling book. It is a moving account of a significant part of American history that everyone should be aware of even if we are not proud of that portion of our American heritage. Every young American student should read this book to better understand the American Indian culture and American history.
Frank said on 10/24/2018:
Very readable with a plethora of resources Cited: A teacher's dream; Ms Anderson has done all the research, and the material in the book would make a great lesson plan for teaching this period of history. I was grateful that the author kept the issue balanced with equal support given to both sides of the conflict.
Scott Wisnom said on 10/24/2018:
This book is incredibly captivating and I can't recommend it enough. You'll fall in love with the characters, and you won't want to put it down!
Kristy said on 10/24/2018:
I will put this on my reading list. Historical fiction is a favorite of mine.
Ana Monroe said on 10/24/2018:
Beautifully written! I couldn't put this book down. I really connected with the characters and felt like I was on the journey with them. Truly a great way to learn.
Rachel F. said on 10/24/2018:
Sounds like a beautiful and important story.

READ MORE ENTRIES
SIGN THE GUEST BOOK

This past September, author Peggy King Anderson traveled the actual Trail
of Death, caravanning by car from Twin Lakes, Indiana, where the Potawatomi
began their forced removal, through Illinois and Missouri to Sugar Creek,
Kansas. Every five years, a group of Potawatomi, family, friends and historians
make this historic journey, organized by the Fulton County Historical Society. To
follow her journey, take a look at her blog. The author’s son, David Thomas
Anderson, designed the logo on the 150 historical highway signs that mark the
Trail of Death across all four states. (see photo above)





What if you were 11 years-old and government soldiers marched into your family’s village and made you leave, along with all of your family and friends? This is exactly what happens to Simu-quah, a Potawatomi girl from the Great Lakes region of Indiana. The year is 1838, and the Forced Removal of Indian tribes has begun. Simu-quah’s father is placed in a jail cage with the other chiefs of her people, and as their two-month forced journey begins, Simu-quah begins to hate the soldier who is so cruel to him. .She also struggles to free her imprisoned father, and other tribal chiefs so they can lead her people back to their homelands in Indiana, at the time of the 1838 Indian Removal. When her plan fails, and her tribe is force-marched 660 miles by US soldiers, Simu-quah finds a surprising way to save her people and to give them hope at the end of their journey.

You can also purchase Peggy’s book from the Indiana History Society Press HERE




Peggy King Anderson has been writing stories for children for over 30 years. In 2013, she was awarded the SCBWI-WWA Lifetime Achievement Award. Her published books include Safe at Home, Coming Home, First Day Blues, and her co-authored book The Fall of the Red Star. In addition she has written four fiction series for Pockets Magazine, including her current series, Tree Frog Trail. Her new book, Two-Moon Journey is a story of her heart, based on her husband’s Native-American tribe and their forced removal from their homelands in the Great Lakes area in 1838.







Email: Peggy@peggyking.com

Phone: (425) 823-6149)



"TWO-MOON JOURNEY is a book to be treasured. Eleven-year-old Simu-quah tells the story of Potawatomi people’s forced removal from their Indiana Homelands in 1838. Simu-quah’s authentic descriptions along with the love she has for her friends and her family brought me right alongside her from the first page to the last.” (Janet Lee Carey, award-winning author of nine YA novels including the Wilde Island Chronicles)


“The story is so vividly described that the reader will feel as if he/she traveled the two month journey to Sugar Creek, Kansas. The secret of the corn, sweet leaf medicine and other Native American traditions provide a cultural insight.”   (Shirley Willard, Fulton County, Indiana Historian}  
This past September, author Peggy King Anderson traveled the actual Trail
of Death, caravanning by car from Twin Lakes, Indiana, where the Potawatomi
began their forced removal, through Illinois and Missouri to Sugar Creek,
Kansas. Every five years, a group of Potawatomi, family, friends and historians
make this historic journey, organized by the Fulton County Historical Society. To
follow her journey, take a look at her blog. The author’s son, David Thomas
Anderson, designed the logo on the 150 historical highway signs that mark the
Trail of Death across all four states. (see photo above)
    Guestbook Comments
    Karen Williams said on November 10, 2018:
    Love what this book is about. Living in Oklahoma, I have Cherokee friends whose ancestors's experienced the Trail of Tears when they were transplanted by force to Oklahoma.

    Holly Cupala said on November 9, 2018:
    We are so excited for this book, Peggy! I bought a copy for the school and need you to sign it, then I gave mine to my best friend, so I need another! Hugs.

    Kathleen Lapi said on November 7, 2018:
    This was heartwarming, exciting, and spiritual all at once! A great read!

    Elizabeth Varadan said on November 2, 2018:
    This sounds like an important addition to any school library or classroom library. This is an issue that seldom is dealt with and is such a tragic part of our country's history.

    Nancy Monroe said on October 31, 2018:
    An absolutely amazing story of love, trial, sharing, division, unity, and forgiveness. All of our emotions are pulled into this story and our history comes alive in the telling of this journey. It is a must-read for all, no matter the age. It is about our humanity and our ultimately, of our coming together in peace as one. Thank you, Peggy King Anderson for bringing this to us and for sharing your heart.

    Crystal Pham said on October 29, 2018:
    A beautiful way to draw attention to an important part of our history.

    Paula said on October 28, 2018:
    I can imagine the terrible experience

    Susan Campbell said on October 28, 2018:
    This is a great site. I'm glad you're able to reach so many people with the story of the removal of an entire village of people, including my ancestors, from Indiana to Kansas. Migwetch!

    Trey Hays said on October 27, 2018:
    Wow! What an interesting book this must be!

    eileen schnabel said on October 27, 2018:
    What a moving and important story. I had heard of the 'trail of tears' but not this. I hope teachers encourage their students to read this! I also thought the road sign designed by the author's son was a BRILLIANT idea.

    Jill Hedgecock said on October 25, 2018:
    Such a tragic point in our history. Thanks for writing a book about it.

    Diana Psyras said on October 25, 2018:
    Thank you! I learned some new Native American history!

    Linda said on October 25, 2018:
    Amazing to travel along the Trail of Death with a group of Potawatomi, and see their enthusiastic response to this book.

    Sarah Maury Swan said on October 25, 2018:
    We just toured the American Indian Museum in Washington, D.C. and were astounded by the wealth of information they presented. The subject of your book will fit right in. I do hope the Smithsonian know about it.

    RJ Mirabal said on October 25, 2018:
    A point of view not often seen. Great idea!

    Lisa L. Owens said on October 25, 2018:
    I'm so happy you wrote this book, Peggy, especially knowing your very personal inspiration for it. Congratulations!

    Patti Wisnom said on October 25, 2018:
    This is a compelling story that successfully portrays a very sad part of history.

    Kay Phillips said on October 25, 2018:
    A very sad and compelling story.

    Marcia Strykowski said on October 25, 2018:
    Sounds interesting. Good luck, Peggy!

    Mike Monroe said on October 24, 2018:
    Fantastic, compelling book. It is a moving account of a significant part of American history that everyone should be aware of even if we are not proud of that portion of our American heritage. Every young American student should read this book to better understand the American Indian culture and American history.

    Frank said on October 24, 2018:
    Very readable with a plethora of resources Cited: A teacher's dream; Ms Anderson has done all the research, and the material in the book would make a great lesson plan for teaching this period of history. I was grateful that the author kept the issue balanced with equal support given to both sides of the conflict.

    Scott Wisnom said on October 24, 2018:
    This book is incredibly captivating and I can't recommend it enough. You'll fall in love with the characters, and you won't want to put it down!

    Kristy said on October 24, 2018:
    I will put this on my reading list. Historical fiction is a favorite of mine.

    Ana Monroe said on October 24, 2018:
    Beautifully written! I couldn't put this book down. I really connected with the characters and felt like I was on the journey with them. Truly a great way to learn.

    Rachel F. said on October 24, 2018:
    Sounds like a beautiful and important story.

    End of Comments
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